News

Amor Mundi 10/18/15

In this week's Amor Mundi, we thank everyone for making "Why Privacy Matters" a huge success, reflect on Steve McQueen's cinematic artistry, and much more! Posted on 18 October 2015 | 8:01 pm

Amor Mundi 5/31/15

In our Amor Mundi, we explore how Title IX can endanger intellectual freedom on college campuses, meditate on our obsession with pictures, and much more! Posted on 31 May 2015 | 11:01 pm

Amor Mundi 11/2/14

In this week's Amor Mundi, we realize that there are two sides to every story, expose the myth of exceptional Chinese education, emphasize a need to rethink the way we educate teachers, and much more. Posted on 3 November 2014 | 10:30 am

The Banality of Evil and Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery”

Shirley Jackson's short story "The Lottery" seems to resonate with Hannah Arendt's notion of the "banality of evil." However, there are important distinctions that separate these conceptualizations of human brutality and inhumanity. Posted on 28 June 2014 | 6:47 pm

Loneliness and Expansive Writing

In The Origins of Totalitarianism, Hannah Arendt asks after the “elements” of totalitarianism, those fundamental building blocks that made possible an altogether new and horrific form of government. The two structural elements she locates are the emergence of a new ideological form of Antisemitism and the rise of transnational imperialist movements, which gives the structure…Read more Loneliness and Expansive Writing Posted on 24 January 2014 | 12:27 pm

No Middle Ground

David Simon, writer of “The Wire,” has a great post responding to my recent essay on the “Misreading of ‘Eichmann in Jerusalem.’” Simon writes: Reading this essay, I began to understand that it suits no one of an ideological bent to land anywhere in the middle on the question of who the Eichmanns are and…Read more No Middle Ground Posted on 10 July 2013 | 10:20 am

Violence, and Thinking With Others

“All thought arises out of experience, but no thought yields any meaning or even coherence without undergoing the operations of imagining and thinking.” – Hannah Arendt, Thinking In the wake of an extraordinarily brutal punctuation to an extraordinarily brutal year of gun violence in the United States and across the continent, the eye of American politics…Read more Violence, and Thinking With Others Posted on 21 January 2013 | 11:06 am

Are American Prisons Totalitarian?

This question may appear curious if not ill-formed. Many of us certainly associate prisons with the minute and pervasive exercise of power over the inmates who inhabit them, but we are also more accustomed to using “totalitarian” to describe dictatorial governmental regimes and sociopolitical movements. As a result, we may be inclined to think that…Read more Are American Prisons Totalitarian? Posted on 30 August 2012 | 12:33 pm

Prisoner of Time

Adam Gopnik’s piece in the January 30th edition of The New Yorker, “The Caging of America,” offers sober and sobering commentary on our country’s predilection for mass incarceration. Gopnik passionately denounces the indifference if not callous disregard that many Americans exhibit toward prisons and prisoners, and he unsettles some of the rigid certainties that dog…Read more Prisoner of Time Posted on 17 February 2012 | 10:30 am