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Amor Mundi 8/9/15

In this week's Amor Mundi, we reflect on the wonders of boredom, admit our bafflement at he rise of ISIS, identify liberal arts' worst enemy, and much more! Posted on 9 August 2015 | 8:01 pm

Dianoetic Laughter

Charles Snyder reflects on how dianoetic laughter frees us from the misery that arises from our constant failure to be able to converse with ourselves. Posted on 26 July 2015 | 8:00 pm

The Dangers of Cynicism

Jeffrey Jurgens explains how Arendt's treatment of Socrates warns us of the ways in which abridged thinking can beget cynicism. Posted on 30 March 2015 | 11:30 am

Amor Mundi 1/4/15

In this week's Amor Mundi, we reevaluate our basic understanding of liberty, reflect on whether economic inequality undermines democracy, realize the blame of the Bush-Cheney White House in allowing torture to flourish in the CIA, and much more. Posted on 5 January 2015 | 11:30 am

Amor Mundi – 8/25/13

Hannah Arendt considered calling her magnum opus Amor Mundi: Love of the World. Instead, she settled upon The Human Condition. What is most difficult, Arendt writes, is to love the world as it is, with all the evil and suffering in it. And yet she came to do just that. Loving the world means neither uncritical acceptance nor contemptuous…Read more Amor Mundi – 8/25/13 Posted on 26 August 2013 | 10:32 am

The Danger of Intellectuals

[T]here are, indeed, few things that are more frightening than the steadily increasing prestige of scientifically minded brain trusters in the councils of government during the last decades. The trouble is not that they are cold-blooded enough to “think the unthinkable,” but that they do not think. -Hannah Arendt, “On Violence” Hannah Arendt’s warning about…Read more The Danger of Intellectuals Posted on 22 July 2013 | 2:20 pm

The Politics of Non-Movement

Did the Arab Spring come from nowhere, or was it preceded by modes of social and political action that might have eluded our common conceptual frames? How do ordinary people in the Middle East manage and even alter the conditions of everyday life despite the recalcitrance of authoritarian governments? These questions formed the starting point…Read more The Politics of Non-Movement Posted on 12 February 2013 | 2:45 pm

The Aftermath of the Arab Spring: Women, Activism, and Non-Interference

In the two years since its inception, the Arab Spring remains an extraordinarily difficult phenomenon to define and assess. Its local, national, and regional consequences have been varied and contradictory, and many of them are not obviously or immediately heartening. These observations certainly apply to Syria: although growing numbers of the country’s military personnel are…Read more The Aftermath of the Arab Spring: Women, Activism, and Non-Interference Posted on 13 November 2012 | 11:17 am

Asking—and Answering—the Question: Does the President Matter?

The Arendt Center recently completed its fifth annual conference, which revolved this year around the past and present state of the U.S. presidency. I attended most of the proceedings, and the presentations and discussions I witnessed were worthy of close attention. Perhaps above all, the conference sharpened my awareness for the prerogatives, possibilities, and limits…Read more Asking—and Answering—the Question: Does the President Matter? Posted on 2 October 2012 | 2:33 pm

Tripoli: Between Power and Violence

“Power is indeed the essence of all government, but violence is not. Violence is by nature instrumental; like all means, it always stands in need of guidance and justification through the ends it pursues. And what needs justification by something else cannot be the essence of anything.” – Hannah Arendt, “On Violence” The last few…Read more Tripoli: Between Power and Violence Posted on 12 June 2012 | 12:14 pm