News


Search News:



Recent News

Amor Mundi 9/20/15

In our Amor Mundi, we reflect on how bureaucratic culture is spoiling freedom on college campuses, wonder at persistent government surveillance, and more! Posted on 20 September 2015 | 8:01 pm

Amor Mundi 11/24/13

Hannah Arendt considered calling her magnum opus Amor Mundi: Love of the World. Instead, she settled upon The Human Condition. What is most difficult, Arendt writes, is to love the world as it is, with all the evil and suffering in it. And yet she came to do just that. Loving the world means neither…Read more Amor Mundi 11/24/13 Posted on 25 November 2013 | 3:26 pm

The Decline of the Jury Trial

The jury trial is, as Alexis de Tocqueville understood, one essential incubator of American democracy. The jury trial is the only space in which most people will ever be forced to sit in judgment of their fellow citizens and declare them innocent or guilty; or, in a civil trial, to judge whether one party’s wrong…Read more The Decline of the Jury Trial Posted on 2 August 2013 | 1:33 pm

The Perplexities of Secularism

Does a cross in a courtroom infringe on the religious freedom of non-Christians involved in legal proceedings? Does it violate the principles of a secular state? These questions have recently arisen in Germany thanks to the trial of Beate Zschäpe. Zschäpe is the one surviving member of the National Socialist Underground (NSU), a band of…Read more The Perplexities of Secularism Posted on 21 May 2013 | 1:06 pm

The Courage of Judgment

“Men=earthbound creatures, living in communities, endowed with common sense, sensus communis, a community sense; not autonomous, needing each other’s company even for thinking (“freedom of the pen”)=first part of the Critique of Judgment: aesthetic judgment.” -Hannah Arendt, Lectures on Kant’s Political Philosophy This fragment from Arendt’s Lectures on Kant’s Political Philosophy is easy to overlook,…Read more The Courage of Judgment Posted on 20 May 2013 | 1:13 pm

Learning From Crisis

“[T]here is another even more cogent reason for [the layman] concerning himself with a critical situation in which he is not immediately involved. And that is the opportunity, provided by the very fact of crisis—which tears away facades and obliterates prejudices—to explore and inquire into whatever has been laid bare of the essence of the…Read more Learning From Crisis Posted on 25 February 2013 | 11:40 am

Dworkin’s Law & Justice

Ronald Dworkin died yesterday, Thursday. He was 81. For much of my early career as someone engaged in the question of justice, Ronald Dworkin was one of my imaginary antagonists. Reading Dworkin was eternally frustrating. I was consumed with the inevitable temptation to take on Dworkin’s unwavering apologies for legal power. Dworkin was the great…Read more Dworkin’s Law & Justice Posted on 15 February 2013 | 3:11 pm

Infinitely Intoxicating

Louis Pasteur once wrote: I see everywhere in the world, the inevitable expression of the concept of infinity…. The idea of God is nothing more than one form of the idea of infinity. So long as the mystery of the infinite weighs on the human mind, so long will temples be raised to the cult…Read more Infinitely Intoxicating Posted on 11 January 2013 | 12:38 pm

The Loss of Judgment Goes Mainstream

  Hannah Arendt feared that our unwillingness to judge and to make decisions was the great moral and political danger facing our world. In her essays and books, Arendt gave voice to what she called the “fear of passing judgment, of naming names, and of fixing blame—especially, alas, upon people in power and high position.”  The…Read more The Loss of Judgment Goes Mainstream Posted on 16 November 2011 | 8:29 am