News


Search News:



Recent News

Amor Mundi 11/15/15

In this week's Amor Mundi, we reflect on Arendt's understanding of evil and good in wake of the Paris attacks, scrutinize farmers markets, and much more! Posted on 15 November 2015 | 8:01 pm

Amor Mundi 6/21/15

In our Amor Mundi, we identify the recent church shooting in Charleston as a speakable act, reflect on the Pope's views about climate change, and much more. Posted on 21 June 2015 | 8:01 pm

Khalil Gibran’s Thoughts on Thinking: Faith and the Heart

khalil gibran
Lebanese-American poet Khalil Gibran reflects on thinking's inability to meddle with faith in this week's Thoughts on Thinking. Posted on 6 May 2015 | 10:00 am

The Story of Reconciliation

Greek_storytelling
Arie Amaya-Akkermans explores the sources of Arendt's indebtedness to storytelling. Posted on 21 July 2014 | 10:33 am

Amor Mundi 4/13/14

Hannah Arendt considered calling her magnum opus Amor Mundi: Love of the World. Instead, she settled upon The Human Condition. What is most difficult, Arendt writes, is to love the world as it is, with all the evil and suffering in it. And yet she came to do just that. Loving the world means neither…Read more Amor Mundi 4/13/14 Posted on 14 April 2014 | 10:07 am

The Aftermath of the Arab Spring: Women, Activism, and Non-Interference

In the two years since its inception, the Arab Spring remains an extraordinarily difficult phenomenon to define and assess. Its local, national, and regional consequences have been varied and contradictory, and many of them are not obviously or immediately heartening. These observations certainly apply to Syria: although growing numbers of the country’s military personnel are…Read more The Aftermath of the Arab Spring: Women, Activism, and Non-Interference Posted on 13 November 2012 | 11:17 am

Beirut’s Elyssar Project: Spatiality and Hegemony

Architecture is at the center of politics. We can see the truth of this statement amdist the controversy about post-war reconstruction of Beirut and the establishment of Solidere—the company created to redevelop the city. Reconstruction in Beirut does not mean simply the physical re-making and structuring of certain “sites of memory” scattered throughout the city.…Read more Beirut’s Elyssar Project: Spatiality and Hegemony Posted on 19 June 2012 | 12:47 pm

Tripoli: Between Power and Violence

“Power is indeed the essence of all government, but violence is not. Violence is by nature instrumental; like all means, it always stands in need of guidance and justification through the ends it pursues. And what needs justification by something else cannot be the essence of anything.” – Hannah Arendt, “On Violence” The last few…Read more Tripoli: Between Power and Violence Posted on 12 June 2012 | 12:14 pm

Out Loud for Human Rights in Lebanon

There is probably no question more debated in the course of Middle Eastern uprisings than that of the status of human rights. Anyone familiar with the region knows that the status of human rights in the Middle East is at best obscure. The question of why there was not a “revolution” in Lebanon is a…Read more Out Loud for Human Rights in Lebanon Posted on 30 May 2012 | 11:29 am

Beirut: Reinventing or Destroying the Public Space?

“The Garden of the Prophet”, Lebanese poet Khalil Gibran’s posthumous book, included the poem “Pity the Nation”, his most famous and that ends with the following stanza: “Pity the nation divided into fragments, each fragment deeming itself a nation.” “Pity the Nation” might well be an eight-stanza history of Lebanon: Fullness of beliefs and emptiness…Read more Beirut: Reinventing or Destroying the Public Space? Posted on 23 May 2012 | 12:33 pm