Fellows

The Hannah Arendt Center hosts post-doctoral fellows, visiting scholars, senior fellows, and doctoral fellows who together form a vibrant and engaged intellectual community at Bard College. Fellows teach one course per semester while pursuing their research. Our current fellows are listed below.

Fellows

Current Fellows

Senior Fellow

Wyatt Mason

Wyatt Mason

Wyatt Mason is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and a contributing editor of Harper's Magazine. His work also appears in The New York Review of Books, GQ, The London Review of Books and The New Yorker. Modern Library publishes his translations of the complete works of Arthur Rimbaud, Rimbaud Complete and I Promise to be Good. A 2003-2004 fellow of the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, he received the 2005 Nona Balakian Citation from the National Book Critics Circle and, in 2006, a National Magazine Award. He has served as a consulting editor at large for the Margellos World Republic of Letters of Yale University Press, an imprint devoted to world literature in translation, and has taught non-fiction writing in the MFA program of Bennington College. He was named a Senior Fellow of the Hannah Arendt Center in 2010. 
2011–2017

National Endowment for the Humanities/Hannah Arendt Center Distinguished Visiting Fellow

William Deresiewicz

William Deresiewicz

Author of Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life (Free Press, 2014). A frequent speaker on college campuses, Bill taught English at Yale from 1998-2008. He is a Contributing Writer for The Nation and a Contributing Editor for The American Scholar. His work has also appeared in The New York TimesThe Atlantic, Harper's, and elsewhere. He was awarded the Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing of the National Book Critics Circle (2012), and the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture's Hiett Prize in the Humanities (2013). 

2016–2017

Research Director

Thomas Wild

Thomas Wild

Thomas Wild  a premiere Hannah Arendt scholar, is an Assistant Professor of German at Bard College. Dr. Wild studied German literature and culture as well as political science in Berlin, and Munich, where he received his Ph.D. He has taught at institutions of higher learning in Germany, at Vanderbilt University, and at Oberlin College.  Expand for more. Expand
2012–2016

Klemens von Klemperer Post Doctoral Fellow

Samantha Hill

Samantha Hill

Samantha Rose Hill received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2014. Her research and teaching interests include critical theory, the Frankfurt School, aesthetic theory, poetic thinking, and German literature. Hill is currently working on two manuscript projects. The first, Into the Dark: Poems of Hannah Arendt, is a dual-language compilation and introduction to Arendt’s poetry. The second project, stemming from her dissertation “The Promise of Mourning,” examines the relationship between loss, mourning, and melancholia to the work of political theory through Hannah Arendt, Walter Benjamin, and Theodor Adorno. This project seeks to intervene in contemporary discussions around Antigone and recognition by turning away from traditional conceptions of political action. Previously Hill conducted post-doctoral work at the Institut für Philosophie at the Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt am Main and served as a visiting lecturer at Amherst College in Spring 2013. She will be teaching in the Political Studies Program.
2015–2017

Post Doctoral Fellow

Stephen Haswell Todd

Stephen Haswell Todd

Stephen Haswell Todd’s dissertation, “The Turn to the Self” (Chicago, 2015), sets out an account of how the concept “autism” functioned in a broad, philosophical context in German-speaking Europe in the early twentieth century, and was then gradually translated and narrowed into the clinical category we know today. In doing so it proposes major revisions to our understanding of the history of autism and also opens up the archive of early autism discourse as a field of inquiries into the nature of private, inner experience. At the Arendt Center he has plans to investigate the transformations of Goethe’s science of morphology into twentieth-century figurations of aesthetics, personality, psychology, and race. In addition to a PhD in Germanic Studies from the University of Chicago, he holds a BA in literature from Bard College.

2016–2017

Associate Fellows

Ian Storey

Ian Storey

Ian Storey is co-editor with Roger Berkowitz of Archives of Thinking, and author of the forthcoming Hungers on Sugar Hill: Hannah Arendt, the New York Poets, and the Remaking of Metropolis, which examines postwar changes in the urban politics of race, class, and representation through the lens of Arendt’s first experiences of the United States.  He also produces contemporary adaptations of German theater, including Rise and Fall of the City of MahagonnyAntigone des Sophokles, and St. Joan of the Stockyards.  Having received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago, Storey’s work centers on urban politics, the politics of aesthetics, and democratic theory.
2016–2017
Jana Schmidt

Jana Schmidt

Jana V. Schmidt's research pertains to questions of literature and art, their status vis-à-vis the political and the social, image theory, mimesis, and the representation of intersubjectivity. Her main focus as a literary scholar is on twentieth century German and American literature, literary theory (including "continental" philosophy and critical theory), and literature's relation to violence.  Expand for more. Expand
2016–2017
Alexander Soros

Alexander Soros

Alexander Soros is a doctoral candidate in the history department of the University of California at Berkeley. In 2012, he established the Alexander Soros Foundation, which supports human rights, social justice, and educational causes.  Expand for more. Expand
2014–2016
Aliza Becker

Aliza Becker

Aliza Becker has worked for three decades managing non-profit organizations related to peace and immigration education and activism. She is also an experienced educator and writer. She served as Executive Director of Brit Tzedek v'Shalom Expand for more. Expand
2014–2016
Charles Snyder

Charles Snyder

Charles Snyder studied philosophy at the New School for Social Research (PhD, 2014). His current writing addresses the relation between philosophy and political life in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, with particular interest in the philosophical schools of the Hellenistic period. Expand for more. Expand
2014–2016
Jeffrey Champlin

Jeffrey Champlin

Jeffrey Champlin received his BA from Middlebury College and Ph. D. from New York University. His teaching and research focuses on connections between literature, philosophy, and political theory. Recent publications examine questions of power and aesthetics in Kleist, Goethe, Hegel, Rilke, and Arendt. He can be reached at jchampli@bard.edu.
2012–2016
Jeffrey Jurgens

Jeffrey Jurgens

Jeffrey Jurgens received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is Fellow for Anthropology and Social Theory at the Bard Prison Initiative as well as Academic Co-Director of the Consortium for the Liberal Arts in Prison. His scholarly interests revolve around themes of migration, citizenship, youth culture, public memory, and the cultural politics of incarceration.  Expand for more. Expand
2011–2016
Jennifer M. Hudson

Jennifer M. Hudson

Jennifer Hudson is a member of the social science faculty at Bard Prison Initiative, Associate Fellow at the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities, and Visiting Assistant Professor of Humanities at Bard College.  She holds a PhD in Political Science, with a specialization in Political Theory and a minor in International Relations, from Columbia University.   Expand for more. Expand
2014–2016
N.A.J. Taylor

N.A.J. Taylor

N.A.J. Taylor has taught at La Trobe University and the University of Queensland, and has held or will hold honorary or visiting appointments at Linkoping University, Roskilde University, Bard College, La Trobe University and The New School, where he was an Australia Awards fellow.  Expand for more. Expand
2014–2016

Visiting Scholars

Dana Mills

Dana Mills

Dana Mills wrote her DPhil thesis, focusing on the relationship between dance and politics at Oxford, where she teaches political theory and feminist political theory. Her first book Dance and Politics: Moving beyond Boundaries: is out in May with Manchester University Press. She has held research fellowships in Northwestern and Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival. She will be a Visiting Fellow at NYU Center for Ballet and Related Arts in the fall of 2016. Dana also campaigns widely on human rights and feminist issues. 

2016–2017
Davide Brugnaro

Davide Brugnaro

Ph.D. student from the University of Padua, Italy (Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Educational Science and Applied Psychology). I graduated (Master’s Degree) in 2013 in Philosophical Sciences at University of Padua with a dissertation on the moral question in Hannah Arendt. Between 2014 and 2015 I worked in a Municipality (in social work) thanks to “Servizio Civile Nazionale” and this is the reason why I started my Ph.D. period six months later than my colleagues. My research interests concern Hannah Arendt and, in particular, my research project intends to investigate the relationship between action and thought, politics and philosophy (but also ethics), plurality and singularity as it is sketched by Hannah Arendt, primarily through the examination of the faculty of judgment. The main interpretative hypothesis, that the research proposes, is that the faculty of judgment seems to be a special key of reading in order to recompose the tension between the vita activa and the ‘life of the mind’: its particular feature, indeed, is to hold together different dimensions of human life.

2016–2017
Geir Aaserud

Geir Aaserud

Ph.D. student from Bergen University College. Aaserud's has many years experience from teaching kindergarten. He has a Master Degree in Early childhood education and studies the relationship between different terms of kindergarten teachers’ culture formation. His research project seeks to answer the following research question: How could kindergarten teachers’ cultural formation processes and conditions be described and understood? Expand for more. Expand
2015–2016

Student Fellowships

Courage to Be Fellowships
2015-2016 Courage To Be Student Fellows

Courage to Be Fellowships

Student Fellowships for Bard scholars working in philosophy, theology, and psychology are offered through the Courage To Be Program at the Hannah Arendt Center. The call for applications is sent annually in August/September. We love hearing from students who are interested in being part of the Hannah Arendt Center. Please don't hesitate to contact us if you would like to learn more about fellowships, or, if you would like to become a HAC student volunteer, email: cstanton@bard.edu Website: http://hac.bard.edu/ctb/
2015-2016 Courage To Be Student Fellows
2014–2016