Fellows

The Hannah Arendt Center hosts post-doctoral fellows, visiting scholars, senior fellows, and doctoral fellows who together form a vibrant and engaged intellectual community at Bard College. Fellows teach one course per semester while pursuing their research. Our current fellows are listed below.

Fellows

Current Fellows

Senior Fellow

Wyatt Mason

Wyatt Mason

Wyatt Mason is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and a contributing editor of Harper's Magazine. His work also appears in The New York Review of Books, GQ, The London Review of Books and The New Yorker. Modern Library publishes his translations of the complete works of Arthur Rimbaud, Rimbaud Complete and I Promise to be Good. A 2003-2004 fellow of the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, he received the 2005 Nona Balakian Citation from the National Book Critics Circle and, in 2006, a National Magazine Award. He has served as a consulting editor at large for the Margellos World Republic of Letters of Yale University Press, an imprint devoted to world literature in translation, and has taught non-fiction writing in the MFA program of Bennington College. He was named a Senior Fellow of the Hannah Arendt Center in 2010. 
2011–2017

National Endowment for the Humanities/Hannah Arendt Center Distinguished Visiting Fellow

William Deresiewicz

William Deresiewicz

Author of Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life (Free Press, 2014). A frequent speaker on college campuses, Bill taught English at Yale from 1998-2008. He is a Contributing Writer for The Nation and a Contributing Editor for The American Scholar. His work has also appeared in The New York TimesThe Atlantic, Harper's, and elsewhere. He was awarded the Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing of the National Book Critics Circle (2012), and the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture's Hiett Prize in the Humanities (2013). 

Website: http://hac.bard.edu/fellows/neh/
2016–2017

Klemens von Klemperer Post Doctoral Fellow

Samantha Hill

Samantha Hill

Samantha Rose Hill received her doctorate in Political Science from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 2014. She is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and The Humanities at Bard College. Her research and teaching interests include critical theory, the Frankfurt School, aesthetic theory, and the History of Political Thought. Hill is currently finishing a manuscript of Hannah Arendt’s poetry, which has been edited and translated into English: Into the Dark: The Collected Poems of Hannah Arendt. Previously Hill conducted post-doctoral work at the Institut für Philosophie at the Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt am Main and served as a visiting lecturer at Amherst College.
2015–2017

Post Doctoral Fellow

Stephen Haswell Todd

Stephen Haswell Todd

Stephen Haswell Todd’s dissertation, “The Turn to the Self” (Chicago, 2015), sets out an account of how the concept “autism” functioned in a broad, philosophical context in German-speaking Europe in the early twentieth century, and was then gradually translated and narrowed into the clinical category we know today. In doing so it proposes major revisions to our understanding of the history of autism and also opens up the archive of early autism discourse as a field of inquiries into the nature of private, inner experience. At the Arendt Center he has plans to investigate the transformations of Goethe’s science of morphology into twentieth-century figurations of aesthetics, personality, psychology, and race. In addition to a PhD in Germanic Studies from the University of Chicago, he holds a BA in literature from Bard College.

2016–2017

Associate Fellows

Ian Storey

Ian Storey

Ian Storey is co-editor with Roger Berkowitz of Archives of Thinking, and author of the forthcoming Hungers on Sugar Hill: Hannah Arendt, the New York Poets, and the Remaking of Metropolis, which examines postwar changes in the urban politics of race, class, and representation through the lens of Arendt’s first experiences of the United States.  He also produces contemporary adaptations of German theater, including Rise and Fall of the City of MahagonnyAntigone des Sophokles, and St. Joan of the Stockyards.  Having received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago, Storey’s work centers on urban politics, the politics of aesthetics, and democratic theory.
2016–2017
Jana Schmidt

Jana Schmidt

Jana V. Schmidt's research pertains to questions of literature and art, their status vis-à-vis the political and the social, image theory, mimesis, and the representation of intersubjectivity. Her main focus as a literary scholar is on twentieth century German and American literature, literary theory (including "continental" philosophy and critical theory), and literature's relation to violence.  Expand for more. Expand
2016–2017

Visiting Scholars

Agustina Varela Manograsso

Agustina Varela Manograsso

Agustina Varela Manograsso is currently a PhD student and research assistant in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Murcia, Spain. Her doctoral research focuses on Hannah Arendt`s concepts of violence, power and individual/collective identity, and her scholarly interests revolve around social inclusion, disposable life, identity, intersectionality, symbolic and physical violence, body, memory and solidarity. 
Her current work builds on a previous research project, which was concentrated on contemporary interpretations of totalitarianism. Within the framework of this project she had the opportunity to delve into Horkheimer´s, Adorno´s and Arendt´s political and philosophical thoughts. This was followed by a MA in Contemporary Philosophy and its Historical Postulates, which was finished with a dissertation on “The concept of ‘Mass’ in Hannah Arendt`s thought”. She also worked as a research assistant in a European Union funded project called MISEAL, which aimed to improve social inclusion and equal opportunities in the participant higher education institutions in Latin-America.
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2016–2017
Dana Mills

Dana Mills

Dana Mills wrote her DPhil thesis, focusing on the relationship between dance and politics at Oxford, where she teaches political theory and feminist political theory. Her first book Dance and Politics: Moving beyond Boundaries: is out in May with Manchester University Press. She has held research fellowships in Northwestern and Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival. She will be a Visiting Fellow at NYU Center for Ballet and Related Arts in the fall of 2016. Dana also campaigns widely on human rights and feminist issues. 

2016–2017
Joy Harris

Joy Harris

Joy Harris completed her MscR in the history of art at the University of Edinburgh College of Art where her research focused on the intersection between performance art and politics. Her thesis investigated the way contemporary theatre directors are using performance to imagine new legal spaces for the rendering of justice for crimes against humanity in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This case study is considered in light of Hannah Arendt’s reporting in Eichmann in Jerusalem. Her research also includes ways in which performance artists, like Adrian Piper and Regina Jose Galindo, are redefining how artists contribute to political discourse. Joy is also an artist and her work has been recently shown in The Netherlands, Venice, Miami, and Los Angeles. “Vanishing Discotecas,” a photography and video installation, focused on gentrification in East Downtown Houston, was shown as a solo-exhibition at Lawndale Art Center in Houston, in conjunction with the FotoFest biennial.  It was also presented at the Centre for Research in Arts, Social Science and Humanities at University of Cambridge. Joy also regularly publishes for art publications.
2016–2017
Julian Robert Shaw

Julian Robert Shaw

I am an ESRC Funded PhD candidate in the Department of Geography at King’s College London. I am currently exploring everyday politics and community tensions inhabiting public spaces in the UK context of Luton, Bedfordshire. Much of my work is grounded in the theoretical insights of Hannah Arendt and Henri Lefebvre, with more than the occasional dose of Marx. Some broad themes of my interest include: public space, ‘communities’, everyday life, action, plurality, disruption, violence, and political economy. In 2011 I received a distinction for my MSc. in ‘Disasters, Adaptation, and Development’ from King’s College London. In 2008 I graduated from Durham University with a BSc. (Hons) in Natural Sciences (Human Geography and Anthropology). My range of academic interests can be seen on my website: espressobookworm.wordpress.com. I can also be followed on Twitter: @BookwormShaw

2016–2017
Davide Brugnaro

Davide Brugnaro

Ph.D. student from the University of Padua, Italy (Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Educational Science and Applied Psychology). I graduated (Master’s Degree) in 2013 in Philosophical Sciences at University of Padua with a dissertation on the moral question in Hannah Arendt. Between 2014 and 2015 I worked in a Municipality (in social work) thanks to “Servizio Civile Nazionale” and this is the reason why I started my Ph.D. period six months later than my colleagues. My research interests concern Hannah Arendt and, in particular, my research project intends to investigate the relationship between action and thought, politics and philosophy (but also ethics), plurality and singularity as it is sketched by Hannah Arendt, primarily through the examination of the faculty of judgment. The main interpretative hypothesis, that the research proposes, is that the faculty of judgment seems to be a special key of reading in order to recompose the tension between the vita activa and the ‘life of the mind’: its particular feature, indeed, is to hold together different dimensions of human life.

2016–2017