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Amor Mundi 05/15/16

In this week's Amor Mundi, we take a look at the persistence of non-facts in an article by Daniel Egber for Five Thirty Eight, take a peek at the relatively unknown, but important Oulipo movement, consider a Digital Humanities and more... Posted on 15 May 2016 | 8:00 pm

Abolishing the World As It Is

Imagine human beings who spend their entire lives confined within a cave peering at a shadowy surface of images. These beings see nothing but images of the real. In the Republic, Plato asks his readers to imagine just this. His provocation does not depict humans held captive by a stream of images projected on mobile devices with bright, sensitive surfaces. Though our own cave tests the limits of the image, Plato’s cave remains instructive. Posted on 28 March 2016 | 8:00 pm

Enlarged Thought in Arendt and Kant

Arendt focuses on a particular passage in Kant's Critique of Pure Judgment, taking his idea of "enlarged thought" as an "expanded movement of thinking" that provides space for one to reach a more "general standpoint," rather than simply relying on a broad set of knowledge. Posted on 10 March 2016 | 8:00 pm

Amor Mundi 1/17/16

In our Amor Mundi, we reflect on the successes of anti-establishment presidential candidates, contemplate the Internet's effect on reading, and much more. Posted on 17 January 2016 | 8:01 pm

“You Ain’t No Muslim, Bruv”: On Religion, Doctrine, and Violence

Ian Storey discusses the hashtag #YouAintNoMuslimBruv as a symbol of humankind's ability to resist a kind of violence that is bound to doctrine. Posted on 16 January 2016 | 12:00 pm

Arendt, Social Change, and History

We appreciate the annotations Arendt made to her copy of Nisbet's "Social Change and History" in this week's Library feature. Posted on 7 January 2016 | 8:00 pm

Amor Mundi 12/13/15

In this week's Amor Mundi, we reflect on how Title IX is being interpreted on college campuses, explore the ethics of cryptography, and much more! Posted on 13 December 2015 | 9:00 pm

On the Justice of Institutions and of Persons: Impartiality and Dependency in Martha Nussbaum and Hannah Arendt

Arendt scarcely addressed distributive justice, but her reasoning could augment that of Martha Nussbaum, who criticized the liberal model of John Rawls. Posted on 15 November 2015 | 8:00 pm

Norbert Lechner and the Uses of Arendt in Argentina

It is no coincidence that Arendt’s reading in Argentina is associated originally with the thinking of political scientist Norbert Lechner. Posted on 18 October 2015 | 8:00 pm

We Never Left: When Nixon Went to China, or when Xi Came to America

The modern Chinese state under President Xi Jinping is an exceedingly different beast than the regimes Arendt understood as inaugurating totalitarianism. Posted on 27 September 2015 | 8:00 pm