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Amor Mundi 2/2/14

Hannah Arendt considered calling her magnum opus Amor Mundi: Love of the World. Instead, she settled upon The Human Condition. What is most difficult, Arendt writes, is to love the world as it is, with all the evil and suffering in it. And yet she came to do just that. Loving the world means neither…Read more Amor Mundi 2/2/14 Posted on 2 February 2014 | 9:28 pm

MOOCs: The Debate Continues

After months in which university after university signed on to the bandwagon for Massive Open Online Courses called MOOCs, the battle over the future of education has finally begun. This week Duke University pulled out of EdX, the Harvard/MIT led consortium of Massive Open Online Courses called MOOC’s. The reason: Its faculty rebelled. According to…Read more MOOCs: The Debate Continues Posted on 3 May 2013 | 4:10 pm

The Progeny of Teachers II: Philip Roth

“Like all great teachers, he personified the drama of transformation through talk.”  —Philip Roth It may be the twinkle in the eye when a light flashes in the student’s mind, or the subtle rise of the head as insight hits, or a purposeful nod as veils of darkness flutter amidst a gust of comprehension. These…Read more The Progeny of Teachers II: Philip Roth Posted on 22 April 2013 | 10:06 am

Amor Mundi 4/7/13

Hannah Arendt considered calling her magnum opus Amor Mundi: Love of the World. Instead, she settled upon The Human Condition. What is most difficult, Arendt writes, is to love the world as it is, with all the evil and suffering in it. And yet she came to do just that. Loving the world means neither uncritical acceptance nor contemptuous…Read more Amor Mundi 4/7/13 Posted on 8 April 2013 | 2:57 pm

Making the Grade

I was at dinner with a colleague this week—midterm week. Predictably, talk turned to the scourge of all professors: grading essays. There are few tasks in the life of a college professor less fulfilling than grading student essays. Every once in a while a really good essay jolts me to consciousness. I am elated by…Read more Making the Grade Posted on 5 April 2013 | 3:04 pm

Say Goodbye to Law Schools: and Credentials More Generally

Law school applications have gone off a cliff. Just look at this statistic from today’s NY Times. As of this month, there were 30,000 applicants to law schools for the fall, a 20 percent decrease from the same time last year and a 38 percent decline from 2010, according to the Law School Admission Council.…Read more Say Goodbye to Law Schools: and Credentials More Generally Posted on 31 January 2013 | 2:52 pm

The “E” Word, Part Two

This Weekend Read is Part Two in “The “E” Word,”  a continuing series on “elitism” in the United States educational system. Read Part One here. Peter Thiel has made headlines offering fellowships to college students who drop out to start a business. One of those Thiel fellows is Dale Stephens, founder of Uncollege. Uncollege advertises…Read more The “E” Word, Part Two Posted on 4 January 2013 | 2:07 pm

The Flipped Classroom

For those of us who care about education, at either the college or high school level, there is nothing more exciting and terrifying today than the promise of the use of technology in teaching. At this moment, numerous companies around the country are working with high schools and colleges to create online courses, tutorials, and…Read more The Flipped Classroom Posted on 5 October 2012 | 5:12 pm

Is College Worth It?

Student debt is suddenly spurring the once unthinkable debate: Is college necessary? Of course the answer is no. But who needs it and who should pay for it are complicated questions. Arendt herself had an ambivalent relationship to academic culture. She never held a tenure-track job in the academy and she remained suspicious of intellectuals…Read more Is College Worth It? Posted on 17 May 2012 | 3:08 pm